Category Archives: Confused, misused and overused words

infamous, notorious

Both have negative connotations when used to describe a person.

If you use them in this way you could find yourself the subject of a defamation action; these terms can be interpreted as libellous because they call into question the character of the person they have described.

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et cetera

Do not use.

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yesterday

Avoid the word wherever possible in broadcast journalism.

It makes the news sound old and stale.

Use it in print journalism only when necessary.

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who, whom

Avoid whom.

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weather conditions

Why not say “weather”?

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we, our

For print news do not use personal pronouns, except in quotes.

If you mean Australians, say so.

Commercial radio stations, however, tend to personalise news stories by talking about “we” and “our”.

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very

Is overworked. It can often be eliminated (or replaced with a more precise term).

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